Selection Variables

Selection criteria are based on the use of selection variables. Some selection variables are preset, or you can create your own from custom properties.

You can place numbers and strings directly in the selection criteria string with or without quotes. Selection criteria strings are case sensitive.

For example, the following selection criteria strings are all valid:

ModelName=6840
ModelName = 6840
ModelName=”6840”

Series = S

While these are not:

series = s
Series = s

Long strings are also supported as selection criteria. For example, the following string is valid:

Series = 3 | (MAC = 00-A0-F8-27-B5-7F | MAC = 00-A0-F8-80-3D-4B | MAC = 00-A0-F8-76-B3-D8 | MAC = 00-A0-F8-38-11-83 | MAC = 00-A0-F8-10-24-FF | MAC = 00-A0-F8-10-10-10)

Due to the potential complexity of long selection criteria strings, it is recommended that you limit the selection criteria to 20 selection variables or less.

The following table lists the preset selection variables:

Columns

The number of display columns the mobile device supports. The possible value range is 1 – 80.

Example:

Columns > 20

EnablerVer

Enabler version number. Values with decimals must be surrounded by double quote marks.

EnablerVer = “3.10-13”

IP

IP address of the mobile devices.

Enter all IP addresses using dot notation. IP addresses can be written in three ways:

Direct comparison with a single IP address. For example, IP = 10.1.1.1.

Comparison with an arbitrary address range. For example, IP = 10.1.1.5 – 10.1.1.15 (This can also be written as IP = 10.1.1.5 – 15.)

Comparison with a subnet. This is done by supplying the network number along with the subnet mask or CIDR value. For example, IP = 10.1.1.0/255.255.255.0
Using CIDR notation, this can also be written as IP = 10.1.1.0/24

KeyboardCode

A number set by the device manufacturer and used internally by the BIOS to identify the keyboard type.

Supported values include:

0 = 35-Key
1 = More than 35 keys and WSS1000
2 = Other devices with less than 35 keys

Example:

KeyboardCode = 0

KeyboardName

The style of keyboard the mobile device is using (46key, 35key, etc.). This selection variable is not valid for CE devices.

Supported values include:

35KEY

46KEY

101KEY

TnKeys

Example:

KeyboardName = 35KEY

Last Contact

The last time the device contacted a server. The parser for the LastContact property allows specifying absolute time stamps or relative ones.

Examples of time-stamp formats:

mm/dd/yyyy

LastContact = “12/22/2005” (All day)

HH:MM mm/dd/yyyy

LastContact = “23:15 12/22/2005” (All minute long, 24-hour notation)

hh:mm AP mm/dd/yyyy

LastContact = “11:15 PM 12/22/2005” (All minute long, 12-hour notation)

Range-forms of the above

The relative format uses an offset from the current time.

<offset>M

LastContact = 60M (60 minutes in the past)

<offset>H

Last Contact = 1H (one hour in the past, the whole hour)

<offset>D

Last Contact = 1D (one day in the past, the whole day)

Range-forms of the above, including inverted ranges

LastContact=7D-1M

MAC

MAC address of the mobile device.

Enter any MAC addresses as a string of hexadecimal digits. Dashes or colons between octets are optional. For example:

MAC = 00:A0:F8:85:E8:E3

ModelName

The standard model name for a mobile device. This name is often a number but it can be alphanumeric. Device details often display the model name.

A few of the supported values include:

1040, 1740, 1746, 1840, 1846, 2740, 2840, 3140, 3143, 3540, 3840, 3843, 3940, 4040, 5040, 6140, 6143, 6840, 6843, 6940, 7240, 7540, 7940, 8140, 8940, PTC960, TR1200, VT2400, WinPC, WT2200, 7000CE, HHP7400, MX1, MX2, MX3, VX1, iPAQ, iPAD, Falcon, ITCCK30, ITC700

Example:

ModelName = 6840

ModelCode

A number set by the device manufacturer and used internally by the BIOS to identify the hardware.

Supported values include:

1= LRT 38xx/LDT
2 = VRC39xx/69xx
3 = PDT 31xx/35xx
4 = WSS1000
5 = PDT 6800
6 = PDT 6100

Example:

ModelCode <= 2

This matches all 38xx, 39xx, and 69xx devices.

OSVer

The OS version as reported by the Enabler. Values with decimals in them must be surrounded by double quote marks.

OSVer = “4.20”

OS Type

The OS type as reported by the Enabler.

OSType = PocketPC

Processor

The processor as reported by the Enabler.

Processor = ARM

ProcessorType

The processor type as reported by the Enabler.

ProcessorType = xScale

Assigned IP

IP address of the mobile device.

Enter all IP addresses using dot notation. IP addresses can be written in three ways:

Direct comparison with a single IP address. For example, IP = 10.1.1.1.

Comparison with an arbitrary address range. For example, IP = 10.1.1.5 – 10.1.1.15 (This can also be written as IP = 10.1.1.5 – 15.)

Comparison with a subnet. This is done by supplying the network number along with the subnet mask or CIDR value. For example, IP = 10.1.1.0/255.255.255.0
Using CIDR notation, this can also be written as IP = 10.1.1.0/24

Series

The general series of a device. This is a single character: ‘3’ for Symbol ‘3000’ series mobile devices, ‘7’ for Symbol ‘7000’ series mobile devices, etc.

Supported values include:

3 = DOS 3000 Series
P = DOS 4000 and 5000 Series
7 = DOS 7000 Series
T = Telxon devices
C = CE devices
S = Palm devices
W = Windows machines
D = PSC and LXE DOS devices
G = Android devices
A = iOS devices

Example:

Series = 3

Rows

The number of display rows the mobile device supports. The possible value range is 1 to 25.

Example:

(KeyboardName=35Key)&(Rows=20)

This example matches all mobile devices with 20 rows and 35-key keyboards.

Syncmedium

The type of synchronization medium used by the mobile device.

Supported values include:

any
ip
serial

Terminal ID

The unique ID for the mobile device generated by Avalanche or assigned by a user. The initial terminal ID is 1, and the values increment as needed. You can redefine terminal IDs for mobile devices as needed. If you are using terminal IDs in a workstation ID, the value must not exceed the character limit for the host. Typically, hosts support 10 characters.

Example:

Terminal ID = 5

@exists

Enables the user to check for the existence of a property. The @exists function name is case-sensitive and can only be used with an EQ or NE operator.

Example:

@exists ne some.property

@exists ==Some.property & Some.property = “value”

 


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